Money & Cash

5 artworks


  • Old $500 Dollar Bill Red HPM Serigraph Print by Steve Kaufman SAK

    Steve Kaufman SAK Old $500 Dollar Bill Red HPM Serigraph Print by Steve Kaufman SAK

    Old 500 Dollar Bill- Red Limited Edition Hand-Embellished Oil Paint HPM Silkscreen Print on Canvas by Steve Kaufman SAK Graffiti Street Artist Modern Pop Art. 2003 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition Canvas, the image is in perfect condition—front of the United States 500 dollar bill money from 1934 featuring US President William McKinley. In the vibrant landscape of modern pop art, the "Old 500 Dollar Bill- Red Limited Edition" emerges as a symbolic piece by Steve Kaufman, also known by his initials SAK. Kaufman, a distinguished figure in the street pop art scene, brings together the legacy of traditional Americana with the dynamic essence of graffiti artwork. This limited edition canvas is a hand-embellished oil paint HPM silkscreen print that radiates the artist's penchant for bold colors and impactful imagery. Created in 2003, this artwork is part of a signed and numbered series, denoting its exclusivity and collector's value. The piece features the front of the United States 500 dollar bill from 1934, with President William McKinley's likeness commanding the center. Kaufman's interpretation infuses this symbol of ancient economic stature with a modern twist, juxtaposing the historical value of the bill with the transient, often rebellious nature of street art. The canvas is described as being in perfect condition, suggesting that the quality of Kaufman's work is preserved, allowing the vivid hues and intricate details to stand out. By reimagining currency, a common element of pop art's critique of consumerism, Kaufman's piece speaks to the transformative power of art over the mundane. His use of silkscreen printing aligns with the techniques of pop art pioneers, while the hand-embellished oil paint brings a tactile dimension often found in the textures of street art. Steve Kaufman's "Old 500 Dollar Bill- Red Limited Edition" is a striking example of street pop art that bridges the gap between historical reverence and contemporary critique. It's an artwork that encapsulates the spirit of its time, reflecting on the value and symbolism of money through the lens of an artist who is equally comfortable with a spray can as with a paintbrush.

    $3,071.99

  • Dollar Sign State 4 AP HPM Serigraph Print by Steve Kaufman SAK

    Steve Kaufman SAK Dollar Sign State 4 AP HPM Serigraph Print by Steve Kaufman SAK

    Dollar Sign- State 4 Limited Edition Hand-Embellished Oil Paint HPM Silkscreen Print on Canvas by Steve Kaufman Graffiti Street Artist Modern Pop Art. AP Artist Proof, Unstretched, Mint directly from the artist in 2002

    $3,264.99

  • $500 Dollar Bill Green HPM Serigraph Print by Steve Kaufman SAK

    Steve Kaufman SAK $500 Dollar Bill Green HPM Serigraph Print by Steve Kaufman SAK

    $500 Dollar Bill- Green Limited Edition Hand-Embellished Oil Paint HPM Silkscreen Print on Canvas by Steve Kaufman SAK Graffiti Street Artist Modern Pop Art. 1995 Signed Custom Framed Front of the United States $500 dollar bill money from 1934 featuring US President William McKinley.

    $3,071.99

  • $100 Dollar Bill Backside HPM Serigraph Print by Steve Kaufman SAK

    Steve Kaufman SAK $100 Dollar Bill Backside HPM Serigraph Print by Steve Kaufman SAK

    $100 Dollar Bill- Backside Limited Edition Hand-Embellished Oil Paint HPM Silkscreen Print on Canvas by Steve Kaufman SAK Graffiti Street Artist Modern Pop Art. 1995 Signed & Numbered Limited Edition of 100 Artwork Size 34x15 Unstretched canvas, the image is in perfect condition. Back of the United States $100 dollar bill money from the 1990s.

    $2,259.99

  • Useless Idiot- White Serigraph Print by Cleon Peterson

    Cleon Peterson Useless Idiot- White Serigraph Print by Cleon Peterson

    Useless Idiot- White Limited Edition Hand Pulled 2-Color Serigraph Print on 290gsm Coventry Rag Paper with Deckled Edges by Cleon Peterson Graffiti Street Artist Modern Pop Art. Size: 18 x 24 Date: 2019 Condition: NEW Artist: Cleon Peterson Hand-pulled black & red screen prints. Printed on 290gsm Coventry Rag paper with deckled edges. Each print is signed and numbered. Limited Edition of 150 The art of Peterson has a strong anti-establishment character and anger, as a creative force, is present throughout most of his artworks. The subject of anger is the artist and with his work, he is turning against society’s deepest weariness and malaise. This LA-based artist is the mastermind behind a series of dystopic artworks paintings, prints, sculptures and murals, exhibited in the US, Europe, and Asia.

    $687.99

Money & Cash

Money & Cash has been a popular topic in graffiti street art for many years. It is often used as a symbol of power, wealth, and corruption in society. Graffiti artists may use images of currency, such as dollar bills or coins, to comment on the influence of money in politics, economics, and culture. One common theme in money-related graffiti is the concept of greed. Artists may use images of fat cats or pigs with money bags to criticize those who accumulate wealth at the expense of others. Graffiti artists may also use images of dollar bills with slogans like "Money Talks" or "Cash Rules Everything" to comment on the ways in which money influences people's behavior and values. In addition to critiquing the negative aspects of money, graffiti artists may also use money-related imagery to celebrate the positive aspects of wealth and success. For example, they may create images of successful entrepreneurs or athletes who have made a significant impact on their communities. Overall, money as a topic in graffiti street art can be used to reflect on the complex and multifaceted ways in which money shapes our world. The cash sign ($) is a popular symbol used in graffiti, street art, and pop art to convey various messages related to money, power, and status. In graffiti, the cash sign is often used as a tag or signature by street artists to mark their work and gain recognition in the community. It may also be used to convey messages about wealth and consumer culture, as well as social and economic inequality. In pop art, the cash sign is frequently used as a motif to comment on the commercialization of art and society. Artists may incorporate the symbol into their work to explore themes of greed, materialism, and the commodification of culture. The use of the cash sign in graffiti, street art, and pop art reflects a complex relationship between money, power, and artistic expression in contemporary culture. ash plays a significant role in both Graffiti Art and Pop Art, although in different ways. Graffiti Art is often associated with street culture and urban environments, and it emerged as a form of rebellion against societal norms and authority. In its early days, Graffiti Art was primarily created by young people who had limited financial means and used cheap spray cans and markers to create their art. However, as Graffiti Art gained popularity and recognition, some artists began to monetize their work through commissioned pieces, selling prints, or even opening their galleries. While the commercialization of Graffiti Art has led to some controversy within the art community, it has also allowed some artists to earn a living from their work. Some of the most famous Graffiti Artists, such as Banksy and Shepard Fairey, have achieved mainstream success, with their works selling for millions of dollars. In contrast, Pop Art emerged in the 1950s and 1960s as a response to consumer culture and the increasing commercialization of art. Pop Artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Claes Oldenburg often incorporated images of everyday consumer objects and mass-produced items into their artwork, highlighting the pervasive influence of consumer culture on American society. The irony of Pop Art is that while it critiques consumer culture, it also celebrates it, and many Pop Artists became successful commercial artists themselves. Warhol, for example, famously declared that "Making money is art, and working is art, and good business is the best art." His prints and other works continue to sell for high prices today. While Graffiti Art emerged as a form of rebellion against authority, it has also become a commercialized art form that allows some artists to earn a living. In contrast, Pop Art critiques consumer culture while celebrating it, and many Pop Artists have themselves become successful commercial artists.

© 2024 Sprayed Paint Art Collection,

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